Dell/Canonical Whitepaper: Juju with KVM and LXC in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS



on 28 July 2014

This whitepaper, co-authored by Dell and Canonical,will show you how to easily deploy cloud services on a single Dell PowerEdge server or a laptop (if that’s all you have). It illustrates how easily you can take the cloud with you using Linux containers, virtualization and Juju orchestration software from Canonical.

Though Juju is normally used with cloud providers (i.e. Openstack, Amazon AWS) or on bare metal in a MAAS environment, it can also be configured to run on a single machine, deploying charms and relations internally to that machine. This allows developers and users to:

  • Experiment with a Juju environment without spending money on hardware or cloud providers.
  • Develop Juju charms and applications locally and then deploy to a cloud environment with little or no modification.
  • Demo small cloud applications from a laptop.

In this whitepaper, we show you how to set up a small, scalable mediawiki cluster, modelled after the mediawiki:scalable bundle in the Juju charm store. Normally this application is lightweight enough to run as all containers, but we will use VM’s to illustrate the concept.

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