ODS Video: Driving quality control into OpenStack cloud development

Alexia Emmanoulopoulou

Alexia Emmanoulopoulou

on 27 July 2015

How do we make sure Ubuntu offers the best possible ecosystem of both hardware and software components for OpenStack? Chris Kenyon talks about how we’re driving quality into the OpenStack deployment journey in the latest of our OpenStack Summit keynotes.

As the cloud landscape matures, enterprise customers are looking for cost-effective, resilient and, above all, validated cloud solutions that they can be sure will integrate and operate effectively. For many, Ubuntu OpenStack offers them these assurances. Kenyon discusses some of the common interoperability and integration issues and explains how the OpenStack Interoperability Lab, alongside tools such as Autopilot and Juju, are driving quality into the OpenStack deployment experience to provide a reliable ‘push-button’ deployment journey.

Click here to find out how Canonical’s OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL) tests, validates and guarantees a host of easy-to-deploy cloud components on behalf of the enterprise.

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